Archive for the ‘Financial Analyst’ Category

MARKET CLOSE: NZ shares fall to end quarter little changed

No Comments » | Posted by Joseph Carr-Boyd
Jun 29 2014

June 30 New Zealand shares fell on the final day of the quarter and financial year-end, leaving the NZX 50 Index little changed in the past three months. Air New Zealand, Pacific Edge and Telecom Corp paced the days decline.

MARKET CLOSE: NZ shares fall to end quarter little changed; Air NZ drops

June 30 New Zealand shares fell on the final day of the quarter and financial year-end, leaving the NZX 50 Index little changed in the past three months. Air New Zealand, Pacific Edge and Telecom Corp paced the days decline.

The NZX 50 fell 2.769 points, or 0.1 percent, to 5141.477. Over the second quarter, the index slipped 0.1 percent. Within the index, 18 stocks fell, 19 rose, and 13 were unchanged. Turnover was $99.8 million.

The index turned negative late in the session even after ERoad confirmed talk that it would go public, announcing plans for a $40 million initial public offering before a listing on the NZX. Some investors had speculated the decision by Hirepool to withdraw from its IPO would deter other companies from seeking to sell shares.

Markets are rebalancing at the end of the month, said James Lee, head of institutional equities at First NZ Capital. The new listing market has not closed at all. It is just a sign that things have to be priced correctly and reflect the risks. First NZ is lead manager for the ERoad IPO.

Air New Zealand declined 2.4 percent to $2.08 and Pacific Edge, which markets a test for bladder cancer, declined 4.9 percent to 78 cents.

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With Britain forging ahead it’s a good time to cut Mark Carney some slack

No Comments » | Posted by Joseph Carr-Boyd
Jun 26 2014

“When the facts change, I change my mind.”

If Mark Carney is looking for a bit of ammunition with which to defend himself after Tuesday’s appearance in front of the Treasury Select Committee, he should look no further than the renowned economist John Maynard Keynes, who used just this response when criticised during the Great Depression that he had changed his position on monetary policy.

But this is not the Thirties, nor is Mark Carney simply a member of the Bank of England’s board, as Keynes was. The Monetary Policy Committee’s decision of when to raise interest rates will be symbolic. As David Miles, an external member of the MPC, reminded us this week, it will also be a clear signal that the economy is returning to full health.

On Tuesday, we found out the reasoning behind Mr Carney’s Mansion House speech earlier this month. The Governor was concerned that markets were not responsive enough to changes in the data. As one economist put it, the analogy of his message would be that it is time to take the “stabilisers off the bikes” of market participants.

“For all the critisicms of forward guidance the Governor appears to be feeling the need to remind markets that in the post-threshold guidance world, the formulation of market rate expectations should be more sensitive to volatility in the data than it has been,” said Sam Hill, an economist at RBC Capital Markets.

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Isis Insurance Testimonial

No Comments » | Posted by Joseph Carr-Boyd
Jun 15 2014

In the short time that Jason and Speedie Consulting have been working with us he has added tremendous value into our business.

Jason has a unique grasp of the insurance industry from a marketing perspective, which allows him to understand the needs of an insurance broker and then provide some fantastic solutions – particularly in the area of on line marketing and social media.

Jason has certainly made a real difference to our marketing results, and has helped us to understand how to track results to gain the very best returns, I would recommend him and Speedie without hesitation

Eddie Johnson

Managing Director

Isis Insurance Services Limited

Google Ban on Porn Ads Welcomed

No Comments » | Posted by Joseph Carr-Boyd
Jun 07 2014

Family First NZ is welcoming a decision by Google to no longer accept pornography as well as all ads that link to sexually explicit websites. Google have also agreed to stop offering sexually explicit apps in their phone app store, Google Play. In Google Ban on Porn Ads Welcomed

Family First NZ is welcoming a decision by Google to no longer accept pornography as well as all ads that link to sexually explicit websites. Google have also agreed to stop offering sexually explicit apps in their phone app store, Google Play.

In a letter sent to advertisers this week, Google have said: Beginning in the coming weeks, we’ll no longer accept ads that promote graphic depictions of sexual acts including, but not limited to, hardcore pornography; graphic sexual acts including sex acts such as masturbation; genital, anal, and oral sexual activity.

“This is a great decision by Google to protect families as internet usage becomes more and more common in NZ homes. The internet should not be left unregulated when it comes to the protection of children. Often, parents are simply unaware of what their children can access, may stumble across, or may intentionally be viewing. The default setting should be the protection of children, young people and families.”

“Because of the availability, affordability, and anonymity of the internet, we must put as many safeguards in place as possible – and sooner rather than later. We must d

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Super debt: That’s just about the size of it

No Comments » | Posted by Joseph Carr-Boyd
Jan 17 2014

This article is by staff writer Jeffrey Steele.

Personal finance gurus have long warned that we Americans have a nasty problem. We spend too much and save too little. Not only do we not look for the best savings accounts, or check on savings account rates, or seek high interest savings accounts, many of us don’t save at all.

But these big thinkers have struggled to come up with a one-word explanation for that miserable mismatch.

Pittsburgh-based Gene Natale, co-author with Matt Kabala of “The Missing Semester,” a book aimed at giving teens and young adults lessons in money management, has managed to put his finger on the one buzzword that explains why a nation once comprised of good little savers now turns out lots of debtors.

Before I divulge that one word, however, let me ask this: Is it sheer coincidence that during the same period that saw Americans junk the notion of saving, we as a nation became junkies of fast food?

Is there more than a serendipitous link between the assumption of debt and the consumption of burgers, onion rings, chicken nuggets, chalupas and sandwiches filled with paper-thin slices of faux roast beef?

And is it just a fluke that the only thing ballooning faster over the last few years than our pile of bills has been our waistlines, inflated by the unshakeable habit of grabbing our fast food fixes at the nearest drive-up window?

I don’t think any of these phenomena are mere happenstance. Inexpens

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